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For Ruth


Before I get back to the business of talking about the garden, I would like to finally fulfill a promise made to a friend months ago, literally. Ruth Bavetta, who has been a guest here previously, has had some seriously awesome good fortune this Spring, with her artwork and poems popping up online and in print. She has been sending me links and I have been collecting them with the goal of posting them all in one place. I meant to do this so long ago, but then there was this biology class….so now, as promised, I submit my link collection;

1) Visual poetry…these are among my favorites.

2) Some artwork…I love the way she deals with light, and also there’s a great photo of Ruth’s beautiful smile :)

3) Another gallery of art…”Sister Ann, Sister Ann” is my favorite!

4) Poetry at “The Barefoot Review”

5) Poet of the month – February 2012.

6) More of the visual poetry, and a great site for female artists.

7) “Let There Always Be”…I love this poem – one of my favorites!

Congratulations, Ruth, for the accolades! You deserve it, and I’m so very happy for you. If there are any pertinent links that I missed, please forward them to me and I’ll do a supplement post.


Hello, everyone – I hope this finds you all happy and healthy and ready for Spring. This past Thursday marks the end of one of my two science classes this semester. It was a class condensed into half a semester and, although it was not a difficult class for me, I’m glad to finally have a little bit of wiggle room in my schedule and taking that final was a load off my mind, literally.

Also, I seem to have made it past the most difficult part of my biology class. The first half of this semester felt like trying to run through pea soup. Today, it’s rainy and windy and flowers are blooming…all those little signs of Spring are recharging my batteries and the world feels less oppressive and serious.

There haven’t been many opportunities to get outside with my camera, so I’ve been clicking with my iPhone on the run, which is the source of all the pictures I’m sharing today. The tulips are especially exciting because I planted them this winter just so I would see them during the semester when I don’t have time to garden. Turns out, I did the right thing and I’d like to thank myself for the forethought. Thank you, self!

One of the most wonderful things that happened turned out to be a very quiet personal moment in the middle of a difficult biology exam last week. We have been mired in chemistry for the last few weeks and I was getting lost in the details and hadn’t been outside in what seemed like forever. I missed gardening and it felt like I would have my nose in a textbook forever and ever…So one of the test questions was to write out in great detail the process of photosynthesis, paying special attention to the part when energy from the sun is transformed into chemical energy in a plant. I took a deep breath and began….”A photon of light from the sun is captured by a complex of light-absorbing pigments embedded in the thylakoid membrane of a chloroplast located in the cell of a leaf.” Somewhere in the middle of writing that sentence, I heard the poetry. I suddenly remembered why I was there in the first place and what all the work was for. The rest of the answer flowed out of me like the lyrics to a favorite song. It was one of the happiest moments EVER! The section on photosynthesis is over and we’re moving on to genetics, but that brief moment of deep and nerdy bliss in the middle of a test was all it took to put the fragments of ‘me’ back into a cohesive whole. It was a good day. I came home and planted seeds to celebrate and while I was out there, I took the following photo…a million photons of light showering my tulips with magic.

....the brightest of light in the darkest of seasons


“Tell a wise person, or else keep silent,
because the mass man will mock it right away.
I praise what is truly alive,
what longs to be burned to death.

In the calm water of the love-nights,
where you were begotten, where you have begotten,
a strange feeling comes over you,
when you see the silent candle burning.

Now you are no longer caught
in the obsession with darkness,
and a desire for higher love-making
sweeps you upward.

Distance does not make you falter.
Now, arriving in magic, flying,
and finally, insane for the light,
you are the butterfly and you are gone.

And so long as you haven’t experienced
this: to die and so to grow,
you are only a troubled guest
on the dark earth.”
― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

...Passiflora edulis


First of all, thank you so very much to all of you for your kind words of praise for the last post pairing featuring Ruth Bavetta’s poem, “Autumn Harvest.” It was a pleasure to be able to break open my very first pomegranate and I can’t wait for next year’s harvest. Stayed tuned for more of Ruth’s talent featured here in the months to come.

...Muir Woods, California


Also, for those of you who requested seeds from my ‘Black Hollyhock’ plant, I will be picking up the padded envelopes today, packing and mailing tomorrow. There are still some seeds available, so don’t hesitate to speak up if you’d like some. And now, I’m off to get busy on the remainder of the year. There are three papers to write, the final to prepare for, lots of year-end business to attend to at work and the big bad holidays are coming. It’s a busy time for everyone so, however you choose to celebrate, avoid, or survive the holiday season, I wish you all the very best of winter cheer…until we meet again.

Autumn Sacrifice

Ladies and Gentlemen, please help me welcome back our dear friend and talented poet, Ruth Bavetta. Her poem “Autumn Sacrifice”, which originally appeared in Spillway, is the perfect way to show off the first pomegranate to come from my fledgling tree. Thank you again Ruth, for sharing your talent.

...Punica granatum - November 2011

Autumn Sacrifice

~ By Ruth Bavetta

When I bring the pomegranates into the kitchen,
already my hands are stained with red.

The bruised globes, with their gaping wounds,
ooze crimson onto the white tiles.

The hard dry skins resist my knife.
A slip, and my blood mingles with the fruit’s.

Cooked with sugar, thickened, poured into jars,
the jelly is both sweet and bitter.

(Previously published in Spillway)

...A plate of rubies

...dark chocolate, almost black


It’s one of those rainy winter weekends when I get to catch up on those garden tasks that do not require my presence in the great outdoors. So yesterday, I sat and pulled my black Hollyhock seeds out of their capsules. There are quite a few! So, I’m going to share them with you. How awesome would it be if next Summer my little flowers, which originally came from Andrea, were spread about the country making someone else happy?! If you’d like to try some in your own garden, please make a comment here with your address in it and I’ll mail you an envelope of Alcea rosea seeds – most likely ‘Nigra’ or ‘Watchman’ cultivars. All comments are approved by me before going public, so I’ll just keep it our little secret and then let everyone know when I run out. Not to worry though, because next fall there will be more, that’s the beauty of plants and seeds.

Hello. I hope this brief post finds you all happy and well. Things have been a bit intense lately, at work and school and especially in my head. There is a team presentation due in class today and another test on Thursday. After that, maybe I can breathe a little bit for a couple of days and think about something else. In the meantime, I wanted to share some photos with you. These were taken in the canyon just North of our home on Sunday. It had been raining and the canyon was beautiful, all the leaves are turning too. Funny, Tom and I wouldn’t have gone on that hike, but I needed some photos of poison oak for the class presentation and it forced us out there. We were both so happy and vowed to go again this coming Sunday. Enjoy:

...Fall colors: Toxicodendron diversiloba (Poison Oak!)


It stopped raining just long enough for our hike, and the blue sky was beautiful.

...blue sky through a Sycamore tree


We found some juicy looking mushrooms growing on an oak tree.

...fungus on oak


I really really LOVE Sycamore trees.

...California Sycamore


This one is surround by a carpet of Poison Oak, which is also growing up the trunk – beautiful and very itchy.

...it really needs a tire swing.


Sometimes, when I’m in this canyon, I forget that it’s right next to the highway.

...a place to rest on the way home.

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